Context Junky

Archives/GLAM, PhD life, history, art, etc.

Category: History (page 1 of 2)

Preservation, presentation, and possibility: oral histories in a complex age

On Saturday, 10 June 2017, I was invited to give the keynote at Oral History Victoria’s symposium ‘Oral history in a digital age‘. This post is an edited version of that talk. A little over a hundred years ago, the ethnographer and anthropologist Frances Densmore sat down with the Blackfoot chief, Mountain Chief. She was […]

The Ernest Westlake Archive: the extensive online resource behind Into The Heart of Tasmania

Stories in Stone: an annotated history and guide to the collections and papers of Ernest Westlake (1855-1922) by Rebe, Mike and Gavan McCarthy of the University of Melbourne’s eScholarship Research Centre, makes available the digitised papers of Ernest Westlake, including those created during his journey to Tasmania in 1908-1910, when he collected over 13,000 stone tools.

Here are Rebe and Mike to tell the story of the archive and explain how two publications and two journeys became entwined.

On Greer, archives and controversy

The thing is about archives … they are the paydirt of history. Everything else is opinion. At a certain point you actually need documents. Germaine Greer, 20 February 2013 I am a product of 1990s academia, a reader of Judith Butler, a postmodernist and a queer. I could say a lot about my own views on […]

40 Years of Museum Computing: a Timeline JS experiment

Humanities in Public is an initiative by Digital Fabulists, described as “the first step towards nurturing a community of researchers who are skilled communicators using cutting-edge tools to blow stuff up (metaphorically, of course).” We kicked off last week, with a session looking at a few basic tools for producing maps, timelines, digital narratives, presentations, […]

Museums, collections and history – Part 2 of 2

This is a continuation of Museums, collections and history – Part 1 of 2 The first cross-institutional exhibition mounted by Museum of Victoria was the ‘Story of Victoria’ which opened in 1984, the sesquicentenary of permanent European settlement in Victoria. Displays combined natural history and technology collections through new display techniques and the social history discipline, […]

Museums, collections and history – Part 1 of 2

In 1954 Richard T.M. Pescott wrote the first book-length history of the National Museum of Victoria, looking back at the 100 years since the institution was founded as the Museum of Natural and Economic Geology in 1854. The work, Collections of a Century, is very much a product of its time.[1] Pescott, Director of the […]

Preserving records for ‘Forgotten Children’

Today the news is filled with stories about the Australian Human Rights Commission’s report The Forgotten Children: National Inquiry into Children in Immigration Detention (2014) and the Government’s reaction to its findings. Of the 800 or so children currently in mandatory closed immigration detention (including 167 babies born there) the AHRC notes ‘the negative impact that prolonged immigration detention […]

Parallel histories, overwhelming histories [#blogjune 23]

Yesterday I spent the first part of my day at the Royal BC Museum. It is a beautiful place, with wonderful displays and evocative installations throughout. But the highlight for me was the new exhibition Our Living Languages: First Peoples’ Voices in British Columbia which opened on 21 June 2014. Though not large, Our Living Languages creates […]

Victoria, BC [#blogjune 22]

After more than 24 hours of travelling on everything from an A380 to a small twin-prop Alaskan Airlines plane, yesterday evening (Pacific Time US & Canada) I arrived in Victoria. Located on Vancouver Island, Victoria is the capital of British Columbia, with a population of just over 80,000 people.[1] As someone travelling from Victoria (the state), […]

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